Skip to main content

About your Search

Hannity 44
( more )
CNN 62
WHUT (Howard University Television) 29
FBC 17
WRC (NBC) 15
( more )
English 674
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 674 (some duplicates have been removed)
brotherhood in egypt called off the million man protest. a little too late. egyptian president morsi asked all concrete barriers to be returned outside the u.s. embassy. in lebanon protesters tonked a kfc. one protesters is dead there. mobs climbed embassy walls in tunisia. riot police were not able to hold them back. 50 u.s. marines are being sent to yemen to secure the u.s. embassy there. it's not just american embassies in danger in sudan mobs broke into the general embassy as well as our own where there are reports of gunshots inside the american complex. jim maceda is on the ground in cairo. ambassador ginsberg remains with us in new york. jim, cairo has seen some of the largest protests of the day. what's the mood? what's going on there? >> reporter: well, it's interesting. it almost feels like two different protests going on. on the one hand, you've got the stand off which is in its fourth day between younger people, more hard core radicals who are only 200 or 300. and they are still in that cat and mouse stand off with riot police. we saw more tear gas today. we saw water cannons as we
president, morsi. president obama warning it could be jeopardizes if they don't take a stand against american attacks. too little too late. morsi asked for $5 billion in loans from the inf telling egyptians it is their duty to protect our guests. in yemens a mob scene. they evacuated to a safe location and no embassy staff was injured. there was still plenty of damage as you can see in the pictures. hundreds of protesters tore through the security wall and smashed bullet-proof windows and torching cars. yemen's president immediately apologized to president obama for the attacks. >>> new developments on the attack in benghazi. we'll get the latest on that. first, we go to cairo. jim is standing by. what is the latest there? >> reporter: hi, willie. it's getting quite noisy here now. several hundred protesters who were setting up camp overnight on tahrir square tried to make another go of it this morning. actually, just about an hour ago, outside the u.s. embassy. they tried to move on the embassy. they fired tear gas. there are concrete blocks blocking off the access to the embassy. i
called both egyptian president morsi and magariaf. the two calls had decidedly different tones. president obama expressed appreciation to libyan president magariaf for the cooperation received from the libyan government and people in responding to the attack. though questions still remain about the role libyan terrorists played in escalating the attacks. with respect to egypt the president had made an interesting comment in an interview earlier yesterday with telemundo. >> would you consider the current egyptian regime an ally of the united states? >> obama: i don't think that we would consider them an ally but we don't consider them an enemy. >> eliot: against this backdrop, president obama's phone call with egyptian president morsi was more pointed with obama stressing the importance of egypt main tang security of u.s. diplomatic facilities. fallout continues as mitt romney continued to fend off criticism for his premature and inaccurate attack on the white house over the violence in the middle east. nonetheless, h
religious motivations. egypt's president, mohammed morsi, was in brussels today, where he denounced wednesday's violence for the first time. his previous failure to do so had caused concern in washington. and president obama had a pointed answer on egypt in an interview last night with spanish-language telemundo. >> i don't think that we'd consider them an ally, but we don't consider them an enemy. they are a new government that's trying to find its way. they were democratically elected, and we need to see how they respond to this incident. in some cases, they've said the right things; in some, they've taken steps not aligned with our interests. >> woodruff: morsi spoke with mr. obama last night and asked for action against the maker of the inflammatory video, titled "the innocence of muslims." >> ( translated ): i called him in order to ask him to put an end to such behavior. and of course, we assured president obama that we will be keen and we will not permit any such event, any such occurrence in our country against the embassy territories in the future. >> woodruff: today, in wa
there. things appear to be calmer and president morsi who was spoke tone by the president has taken heed and security forces are in place, you can see in large numbers. karen, why aren't many like mccain willing to refute trumped up charges that romney and his supporters perpetuate? this may be doing long term damage to their party. >> well, and it may be frankly doing some long term damage to america's standing in the middle east. these words have consequences. technically, we know a lot of these guys are crazy from the outside, they look at these guys and say these are duly elected leaders in your country saying these things. that's the other piece of things in terms of how irresponsible some of that is. i think they see a political opportunity here and they're going for it. one of the strongest, you know, advantages that president obama has had throughout this campaign has been foreign policy, and the other thing is i think they're trying to deflect from the fact that part of the problem, part of the reason we have the relationship and some of the tensions that exist are because of th
, of course, friday prayers. egyptian president morsi has called for protests outside all of the mosques here, but that they remain peaceful and dignified. in tens, perhaps hundreds of thousands in the streets tomorrow, anything could happen. what a far cry from my own perspective from the old mubarak days when just the appearance of a few protestors down below at atahrir square would trigger beatings and arrests by the regime. just using that matrix, this administration, this new government has come a long way. >> thank you very much, jim maceda live in cairo. there's a lot of reaction to the president's revealing comments about the u.s. relationship with egypt. >> i don't think that we would consider them an ally, but we don't consider them an enemy. they're a new government trying to find they are way. they were democratically elected. i think that we are going to have to see how they sfond resp this incident. how they respond to for example maintaining the peace treaty with israel. >> richard engel who is on the ground in egypt said he had to, quote, sit down when he heard those words fro
people to watch today, that people were watching is egyptian president mohammed morsi addressing the u.n. for the first time take a look. >> translator: the behavior by some, some individuals and the insults heard on the prophet of islam muhammad is rejected. we reject this. we cannot accept it. and we will be the opponents of those who do this. we will not allow anyone to do this. >> so now morsi also reiterated he is against the use of violence. and yesterday, joel, president obama offered this robust defense of freedom of speech as a pre-eminent right in our country but meanwhile while this speech comes together is there a conflict between those two visions? >> thank you, thomas, for having me. there's really not a conflict. in a sense, president obama and netanyahu bracketing the speeches today of ahmadinejad and morsi and we witness something fascinating which is that morsi shown that egypt is now taking a more aggressive leadership role in the middle east while iran has become more isolated, is on the ropes and ahmadinejad is season almost as a past, a clowny-type figure but this
with the governments in egypt. the president picked up the phone and talked to president morsi. in egypt, the security provided to our personnel and our embassies dramatically increased. >> it took two days for the president morsi to say anything about it. >> president morsi has been out repeatedly and said that he condemns this violence, he's called off and his people called off any further demonstrations and has made very clear that this has to stop. >> you bring up -- >> frankly, in tunisia, in yemen, and of course in libya, where the government has gone out of its way to try to step up security and express the deepest remorse. we're quite popular in libya as you might expect having been a major part in their revolution. what transpired outside of our consulate in benghazi wasn't an expression of deep-seeded anti-american sentiment. quite the contrary. the outpouring of sympathy and support for ambassador stevens and for the united states, the governor of libya, and the people on the streets saying, how pained they are about this is much more reflective of the sentiment toward the united states tha
. president morsi sent out the word this is not acceptable. even with peaceful protests. but the spread of this, andrea is still with us. she tweeted out drawing attention to due nae sha especially and the loyalty to the united states. if this goes to an epic proportion there as far as outcry, where does the united states stand with some of these countries that we backed? >> i think this is a critical day. it's friday. it's the height of prayer day. the height of protest day. if everything cools down over the weekend, i think that this -- we might be through the worst of it. i think the thing that we need to keep an eye on is not so much what happens over the next one or two or three days. unless it really kicks off. the thing that is most distressing is that a piece of propaganda, if you will, can you plucked out of thin air on the internet i ma'ams and rebel rousing. we should fear for this the next time this happens. it seems to turn on and off at any moment. >> what can you do? we're not afghanistan. you cannot block youtube. we're not china where you will sensor and limit the infor
>> rose: welcome to the program. to want, a conversation with mohamed morsi, the president of egypt. >> ( translated ): what happened in cairo was not something that was directed, aimed at the u.s. embassy as an attack, however, the u.s. embassy represents a symbol for the egyptians to express their-- they did not accept what happened from some of the citizens of the united states who offended the prophet mohammed-- peace be upon him. there was also somebody who wanted to burn the koran and this is something we do not accept at all. so the demonstrations were an expression of a high level of anger and a rejection of what is happening and the u.s. embassy represents the symbol of america as a people and government so people, the demonstrators, had a loud voice and as a government, it's our responsibility as the government of egypt we protected the embassy. we do not condone any attack against any embassies or any guests. this is a part of our principles and culture and what our religion orders us to do. >> rose: so the united states government and egyptian government are friends, not
is not doing much to calm it. president mohamed morsi says he objects to the protests, but denounces the attacks on the foreign embassies. egypt needs the west, they're looking for 5 billion in loans from the international monetary fund, the protests are small, but not isolated. there have been angry demonstrations in 11 countries, so far, half of them in places where washington supported protesters who toppled their regime, bringing democracy, but also unleashing deep hatred now focused on u.s. properties overseas. more protests, brian, are expected here tomorrow. but in a positive note they are not supposed to be near any embassies. in libya, authorities say they have started making arrests in connection with the consulate bombing and that they have more militants under surveillance. an fbi team is expected to arrive soon, and reinforcement, about 50 marines have already arrived at the u.s. embassy in tripoli. >> all right, richard engel, back in tahrir square, cairo tonight. thank you, richard, we'll have more on this anti-islam film in just a second. >>> but first, we're learning
dictators does not produce a region that was to be more like the west. he did president mohamed morsi, is doubling condemnation of the film -- egypt's president, mohamed morsi, it is dealing with condemnation of the film and condemnation of the violence. >> we are not -- we are against those acts. >> address have been made in benghazi -- arrests have been made in benghazi. it is not clear whether this was a planned attack. president obama is campaigning for reelection. he condemned the violence. >> i want those around the world to hear me who would do less harm -- no act of terror will go unpunished. it will not deny the life for the values that we boston the light of the values we proudly present to the rest of the world -- it will not dim the light of the volumes that we proudly -- of the values we proudly present to the world. >> somebody made an offensive film, but that does not justify these actions against americans or american embassies. people can demonstrate an express their opinion peacefully -- demonstrate and express their opinion peacefully. >> among the people, america a
, of course. >> president morsi geoghegan impassioned speech about the fruits of freedom and dignity. he said the u.s. has to address the phenomena of islamic phobia. michael, thanks for being with us. what did you make of his decision to put the palestinian question brought and center in his speech? >> i think it would have been surprising if he did not begin with the question of palestine. this has been traditionally not only in egypt but in the arab world the preeminent foreign policy issue of the region. now that the muslim brotherhood and its president is in power, i think it would have been surprising if they did not showcase this issue, because obviously it has formed a big part of their foreign policy thinking for years. >> egypt received $1.6 billion in aid a year from the u.s. if egypt has a where your relation with the u.s., will that a continue? >> it is an interesting moment when egypt is partially reconstructing it shrek -- its relation with the united states. the military relationship continues, and that has gone on for many years. yet now there is an elected civilian president
people not attack foreign embassies. they didn't listen to that. however, president morsi has ordered the police and military to dig in and they have done that, so far, to protect the american embassy here. of course, that was breached on tuesday when they took down the american flag here. one of the demands that the protestirs have made is the u.s. ambassador leave. that has not happened, according to local reports. she is in the country, although there is a lot of graffiti outside the united states embassy, spray-painted by a number of protesters, including one that says, quote, take care, america. we have 1.5 billion bin ladens. they are chanting, our soul, our blood for the prophet muhammad. the big difference from what we saw 18 months ago in the revolution, was that back then, people were talking about freedom and democracy and how much they loved america. now they are talking about how angry they are at america and chanting "death to america." sean, back to you. >> sean: thanks for that report. as anti-american protests spread, this administration is trying to deflect blame for
that has sparked outrage in the middle east. and mohamed morsi has called off a day of protests, and has he made the strongest call for the m muslim brotherhood who said they would form a human chain to protect those inside. >>> and to egypt where an attack has been made on the american consulate in benghazi and now on the ground investigating the murders of two diplomats including ambassador chris steven stevens and two former navy s.e.a.l.s who died trying to protect the consulate survivors. and here in the u.s., the white house is not backing down from the critique of president obama unlike mitt romney. >> i said that the statement was inappropriate, and that is why they backed away from it. >> and no direct response to when the president says you shoot first and aim litter. >> well, this is politics. >> and as he attacks his own party and some are questioning the wisdomf of the assault and the foreign policy advisers. >> it is amateur, and if e had not embarrassed himself and ernl internally the campaign understands he screwed up. >> whoever is advising mitt romney, and whoe
. >> might they not be protecting our embassies? 48 hours after the event president mohamed morsi put out the statement: >> man it took him forever to say that. at the same time, mohamed morsi continues and says: >> it is no such thing. we will not put an end to that film, because we have a first amendment here. that would be chalked up as a sad day for you. mohamed morsi, of course knows that, but he's trying to appeal to his right wing base in his country. meanwhile, erin cunningham, the global post senior correspondent in cairo said: >> that's a very good question. matter bradley said they were withdrawn weeks ago. >> the egyptian response, tweet from the muslim botherhood says: that's what they're putting out there. they say muslim brotherhood leaders have called for a nationwide protest in cairo tomorrow against an anti islamic video posted on you tube. calling for more protests in the middle of this mess? that doesn't seem very helpful. our embassy puts out a statement saying hey, thanks, by the way have you checked out your own arabic feeds? i hope you know we read those too, meani
are dedicated to supporting him. meet with president morsi from egypt and talk about what happened there. maybe meet with the president from libya. to not meet with anyone but the people on "the view" sends a emergency it is more about politics. >>neil: i don't know the history of these things during the election years, maybe the entertainment media is so big today. he figured, and who am i to know, if i meet with one i have to meet with 11 others and i'm not going to meet with any. maybe that was the rationale. what do you think? >>guest: i think he was afraid to meet with any of them. he would be afraid of meeting with prime minister binyamin netanyahu because this would be a report they didn't get along. that impacts with jewish voters. he would meet with morsi and maybe not be able to be as hard as he would like and that impacts other people watching our relationship with egypt. any meeting he would have with anyone there could have been some risk something negative would come out so rather than meeting with anyone at all, go on "the view" and hope we can garner more votes. >>neil: i will g
what happens happening in cairo and the fact that mohamed morsi belatedly seemed to have spoken against the protests but he seems to be walking a tightrope. >> reporter: belatedly and half heartedly, you could say, he condemned the violence in libya but did it with a caveat saying, yes, but we also oppose any insulting of religion and we think that this is something that should be denounced and that action should be taken against it. he was trying to talk to president obama and trying to assuage some of the fears but also address his own people and give the protests on the street a degree of credibility. his party is calling for more demonstrations tomorrow. when you look at kind of criticism and the reactions from the government of the arab world, the one in yemen was, by far, the -- excuse me libya, by far the strongest, that was immediate and heartfelt condemnation. then in yemen today, another immediate and fairly sincere condemnation. and then this very couched statement from president morsi while he's on a european tour. >> now president morsi has yet to develop a relationship wit
, once president obama called president morsi, immediately in egypt, the security forces came out and have provided very significant protection. same in tunisia, same in libya, same in yemen. and all of these leaders have very forcefully conveyed their condemnation of what had transpired. >> there were conflicting messages from morsi. in arabic, they said protest. in english, they said protect. >> what has happened is that the egyptian government has protected our facilities. our embassy is open today. things are calm. and morsi has repeatedly been clear in his condemnation of what has occurred. we are in these partnerships, david, over the long-term. despite the bumpy path and the disturbing images, it's in the united states fundamental interest that people have the ability to choose their own governments, that the governments be democratic and free. that's in our long-term best interest. we need to reinforce that. >> we are in the middle of a heated presidential campaign. there are different foreign policy visions. that's why we wanted to dedicate the hour today to understand th
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 674 (some duplicates have been removed)